Asking for Sponsorship

Here are some simple tips, from a dyed-in-the-wool introvert turned successful philanthropist (Kat) — and be sure to check out our email template and conversation script below!

Fundraising Pro Tips

1. Start with those closest to you: muster up your courage and ask your best friends or family. If you can do this in person, even better! People are much more sympathetic in person (for serious). Emphasize that they don’t need to donate a specific amount, but give them an example you think is appropriate for their economic situation. If you’re asking in person, show them the website and fundraiser page–it emphasizes that it’s legitimate, and provides them a visual to help them remember the fundraiser.

I promise: people will NOT be offended! If they can’t help, they’re still awesome. Thank them. Y’all will still be friends/family.

2. Once you have one or two sponsors, expand your network! Use the email or script below, and add personalized bits (just like querying) wherever you can. If you can query, you can ask for sponsors. It’s even easier because your potential sponsor already knows and cares about you!

3. If someone just wants to donate right away in your name, that’s fine! For in-person asks, consider printing links to the Mighty Pens team page and the fundraiser page to hand out. Even better: have the page pulled up and ready-to-go on your phone or computer.

4. Give thanks to your sponsors both when they agree to sponsor and once they donate. This encourages others to donate, and also just feels nice. Try it publicly, on social media, with a direct shout out (as long as they’re okay with the attention!) Or better, get some nice cards and really hand mail them a note! You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.

5. Keep your sponsors (and therefore folks who haven’t responded yet) updated! Even after they donate, let them know how the campaign is going, how your writing is going. This can be through social media, email, or in person. Repetition helps remind people to donate when they don’t have their information handy.

Asking for Sponsorship

Here are some simple tips, from a dyed-in-the-wool introvert turned successful philanthropist (Kat) — and be sure to check out our email template and conversation script below!

Fundraising Pro Tips

1. Start with those closest to you: muster up your courage and ask your best friends or family. If you can do this in person, even better! People are much more sympathetic in person (for serious). Emphasize that they don’t need to donate a specific amount, but give them an example you think is appropriate for their economic situation. If you’re asking in person, show them the website and fundraiser page–it emphasizes that it’s legitimate, and provides them a visual to help them remember the fundraiser.

I promise: people will NOT be offended! If they can’t help, they’re still awesome. Thank them. Y’all will still be friends/family.

2. Once you have one or two sponsors, expand your network! Use the email or script below, and add personalized bits (just like querying) wherever you can. If you can query, you can ask for sponsors. It’s even easier because your potential sponsor already knows and cares about you!

3. If someone just wants to donate right away in your name, that’s fine! For in-person asks, consider printing links to the Mighty Pens team page and the fundraiser page to hand out. Even better: have the page pulled up and ready-to-go on your phone or computer.

4. Give thanks to your sponsors both when they agree to sponsor and once they donate. This encourages others to donate, and also just feels nice. Try it publicly, on social media, with a direct shout out (as long as they’re okay with the attention!) Or better, get some nice cards and really hand mail them a note! You’d be surprised at the difference it makes.

5. Keep your sponsors (and therefore folks who haven’t responded yet) updated! Even after they donate, let them know how the campaign is going, how your writing is going. This can be through social media, email, or in person. Repetition helps remind people to donate when they don’t have their information handy.